UN climate talks in limbo as rifts among countries remain

National and World

Among the issues at stake are aid for poor countries suffering the impacts of climate change

(AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)

Demonstrators scuffle with UN security staff members during a protest at the COP25 summit in Madrid, Wednesday Dec. 11, 2019. World leaders agreed in Paris four years ago to keep global warming below 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit), ideally no more than 1.5 C (2.7 F) by the end of the century. Scientists say countries will miss both of those goals by a wide margin unless drastic steps are taken to begin cutting greenhouse gas emissions next year. Claiming that the message doesn’t seem to be getting through to governments, over one hundred activists led by representatives of indigenous peoples from Latin and North America made their way to the talks’ venue, blocking for some tense minutes the entrance to a plenary meeting where U.N. Secretary General António Guterres was about to speak. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)

MADRID (AP) — Countries remained deadlocked Saturday in talks over combating climate change as U.N. talks dragged on beyond the official deadline with no end in sight.

Chile’s environment minister, Carolina Schmidt, who is chairing the two-week talks in Madrid, urged officials from almost 200 countries to recognize the “overall balance” of the latest draft agreements hammered out overnight.

“We must show the outside world that we deliver,” she said.

Environmental activists staged protests inside and around the venue during the talks, as they have around the world in the past year, to demand leaders take bolder action against global warming.

Many nations and observers said the latest draft agreements risked backtracking on existing commitments made in the 2015 Paris climate accord and didn’t reflect the urgent warnings from scientists that greenhouse gas emissions need to fall sharply, and soon.

“If this text is accepted, the low ambition coalition will have won the day,” said David Waskow of the World Resources Institute, a Washington-based environmental think tank.

Among the issues at stake are aid for poor countries suffering the impacts of climate change and efforts to agree rules for international markets to trade carbon emissions vouchers.

Schmidt said that the latest drafts attempt to provide “a sensible and workable solution” on carbon markets.

___

Follow AP’s climate coverage at https://www.apnews.com/Climate

___

The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

Copyright 2020 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Trending on WKBN.com