Shipping snags prompt US companies to mull retreat from China

National and World
Importers are contending with a perfect storm of supply trouble - rising prices, overwhelmed ports, a shortage of ships, trains, trucks - that is expected to last into 2022.

In this April 29, 2021 photo, The Warnow-Dolphin container ship enters PortMiami, in Miami Beach, Fla. Importers are contending with a perfect storm of supply trouble — rising prices, overwhelmed ports, a shortage of ships, trains, trucks — that is expected to last into 2022. (AP Photo/Marta Lavandier)

WASHINGTON (AP) – Importers are contending with a perfect storm of supply trouble – rising prices, overwhelmed ports, a shortage of ships, trains, trucks – that is expected to last into 2022.

The experience is disturbing enough that many are reconsidering cost-saving decisions they made in recent years to shift production out of the United States to China and other low-cost producers.

Now, they think, it might make sense to bring manufacturing back across the Pacific – at least to Mexico, if not the United States – to protect themselves from the risks of relying on factories an ocean away in China.

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