(WHTM) — With the dog days of summer upon most of the nation, we are not the only ones who have to put up with the heat and humidity. Our pets deal with it too!

But what do you do if you see a pet or animal that has been locked in a vehicle, with little to no ventilation? According to AAA, there are laws in Pennsylvania and Ohio that protect animals locked in hot cars.

The Pennsylvania Animals in Distress law (Act 104 of 2018) authorizes public safety professionals to remove dogs and cats from unattended motor vehicles when it is deemed to be in imminent danger by any means. This law included protecting pets suffering from extreme temperature, hot or cold, dehydration due to lack of water, and collar and leash entanglement. The Ohio law goes for any person, not just law enforcement.

The law gives law enforcement, animal control, humane police, and emergency responders civil immunity from lawsuits if they need to break into a vehicle to save a pet.

Rescue officials must attempt to locate the owner before breaking into the car, and are also required to leave a note explaining the situation.

In Ohio, and Ohio R.C. 959.133 offers protection to anyone, not just law enforcement. The law reads that a person shall be immune from civil liability for any damage resulting from the forcible entry of a motor vehicle for the purpose of removing an animal from the vehicle if the person does all of the following:

(1) Determines the vehicle is locked or there is otherwise no reasonable method for the animal to exit the vehicle.

(2) Has a good faith belief that forcible entry into the vehicle is necessary because the animal is in imminent danger of suffering harm if not immediately removed from the vehicle and, based upon the circumstances known to the person at the time, the belief is a reasonable one.

(3) Has made a good faith effort to contact the local law enforcement agency, the fire department, or a 9-1-1 operator prior to forcibly entering the vehicle. If contact is not possible prior to forcibly entering the vehicle, the person shall make contact as soon as possible after forcibly entering the vehicle.

(4) Makes a good faith effort to place a notice on the vehicle’s windshield with the person’s contact information, the reason the entry was made, the location of the animal, and the fact that the authorities have been notified.

(5) Remains with the animal in a safe location until law enforcement or emergency responders arrive.

(6) Used not more force to enter the vehicle and remove the animal from the vehicle than was necessary under the circumstances.

(B) Nothing in this section shall affect the person’s civil liability if the person attempts to render aid to the animal in addition to what is authorized by this section.

(C) A person shall not be immune from civil liability for any damage resulting from the forcible entry of a motor vehicle for the purpose of removing an animal from the vehicle if the person’s actions constitute recklessness or willful or wanton misconduct with regard to the forcible entry of the motor vehicle.

(D) As used in this section, “harm” means injury or death.

AAA says If you see an animal in distress, you should contact 911 immediately.

For information regarding pet safety during extreme heat, click here.

Patty Coller contributed to this report.