Passover during a pandemic

Coronavirus

Rabbi Meretsky says the first Passover, from the book of Exodus in the Bible, is relatable to us today

(WTAJ) – Wednesday night is the first of the eight days of Passover.

This year, Jews are celebrating it a little differently than they typically do, some say it’s actually pretty similar to the original Passover meal.

Dov Gordon is studying at Penn State to be a Rabbi.

“Baruch atah, Hashem Eloheinu, Melech haolam, haMotzi lechem min haaretz,” which means, “Blessed are you Hashem our God, King of the Universe who brings forth bread from the Earth,” Gordon, said.

He says Rabbi Nosson Meretsky, has given out materials and instruction needed for conducting a Passover dinner known as a “Seder”.

Rabbi Meretsky says the first Passover, from the book of Exodus in the Bible, is relatable to us today.

“Just like with the first Passover Seder, 3,332 years ago where Jews were actually quarantined, it says Jews were not allowed to leave their house until the morning, this year again, we’re going to be celebrating in that same kind of way,” Rabbi Meretsky, said.

Dov believes we can draw on the story of the Passover or “Pesach” for strength and encouragement.

“There’s definitely hope in that story and it can be applied, you know it’s not just for Jews, it can be applied to everybody-if we hang on and we have hope and then we follow the directions that our government’s telling us to do, “this too shall pass,” Gordon, said.

Some religious Jews are having virtual Passover Seders on Zoom, while orthodox folks Rabbi Meretsky are abstaining from the computers during the holiday, and solely celebrating the Passover with their household.

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