What is the best type of carpet for your home?

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Finding the best carpet for your home starts out simple and sometimes becomes complicated

Carpet Types: What Is The Best Carpet For Your Home

Finding the best carpet for your home starts out simple and sometimes becomes complicated. You know you want something that will look good in your home, feel great, and most importantly, stay that way for years to come. So you go to the local carpet store or home center and that’s when it gets complicated.  Unless of course, you choose the professionals at Satolli Carpet & Floor Covering.

Unlike shopping for cars or clothes, a lot of different carpet styles look very similar, yet prices vary. The fiber that is used to make the yarn that is then made into carpet is where the difference starts. How that fiber is made into yarn is the second determining factor and how it is then tufted (sewn) into carpet is the next key difference.

More than 90 percent of today’s carpet is made of synthetic fiber—nylon, polyester or polypropylene. While each fiber has somewhat different characteristics, they are all made basically the same way.

Once the fiber has been extruded it is bundled together and twisted into a yarn and then heat set to lock in the carpet fiber’s shape. Hundreds of needles arrayed across a machine sew the yarn into a backing. Later, a second backing will be attached to give it additional strength and stability.

How well the carpet will perform depends on how well the yarn is made and how densely the carpet is tufted. The general rule is that the more filaments twisted into a yarn, the stronger it will be and the denser the carpet is (more tufts per square inch), the better it will perform. Keep in mind though that the longer the pile height, the more likely a carpet is to crush (think of traffic paths or marks where furniture has been placed on top of the carpeting).

As complicated and sometimes confusing as this sounds, it’s always made easier with help from Satolli Carpet & Floor Covering. 

VINYL FLOORING

Vinyl has been a popular flooring choice in American homes for decades. But today’s vinyl flooring – as many of the big-name manufacturers are quick to point out – is not your grandmother’s kitchen flooring.

Now grouped into a category called “resilient flooring,” today’s vinyl floors are manufactured using the latest advances in flooring technology. The shiny, plastic-looking floors that were once prone to scratching and scuffing, now feature more matte finishes, and are far more durable, easy to maintain, and wear-resistant than their distant cousins. In addition to offering better performance, these floors have gotten a bit of a makeover. Available in sheets, tiles, or planks, today’s vinyl flooring comes in a huge variety of colors, patterns, and trendy designs, with many high-end styles impressively mimicking the look and textures of popular materials such as real ceramic tile, stone, and wood.

Satolli Carpet & Floor Covering has hundreds of styles and colors to make your new floor the perfect choice for your home.

Why Choose Resilient Vinyl?
Vinyl is one of the most versatile materials used in flooring. It is highly resistant to mold, mildew, and moisture, making it one of the most popular flooring options for kitchens, bathrooms, laundry rooms, and just about any room in which occasional spills and moisture are a concern. Also one of the most affordable flooring materials out there, vinyl is easy to install over most existing flooring, and it’s easy to maintain. Vinyl’s built-in cushiony underlayment also makes it warmer and softer underfoot than real tile, stone, or wood.

LAMINATE FLOORING
From stone to wood to ceramic tile, today’s laminate floors can emulate almost any surface, making them a high demand, low cost option to the real things. Laminate floors are easy to install, easy to maintain and offer terrific resistance to stains and wear. But how do you choose which one is right for you?

What’s your style?

There is no limit to the colors, textures, and finishes of laminate floors. The look and feel of rare exotic hardwoods or rich stones can be achieved thanks to a highly detailed photographic process.

A laminate floor can be used in almost any room of your home. It can be sensitive to excessive moisture, though, so a bathroom or covered patio is probably not such a good idea for this otherwise very versatile product.

Laminate is its own flooring category and possesses its own features, performance benefits and styling. You can get a laminate hardwood floor with an oil finish or hand-scraped look; long, short, wide or narrow planks; sixteen-inch square tiles or stones; bricks; even photographs that you shot yourself (should you be so inclined).

Satolli Carpet & Floor Coverifng has hundreds of color, styles and species from a vast array of manufacturers from which to choose, all on display in their beautiful downtown Warren showroom.

How will you install it?

Installing a new laminate floor is fast, easy and not as messy as you’d imagine. Laminate is typically floated over a level subfloor. No nails, staples, glue or tape are required. You simply leave a fraction of an inch around the perimeter of the room and click your laminate together. It locks fast and tight with almost no gaps between the pieces.

Of course, the most important component of laminate is the underlayment. Like a carpet cushion, this is the soft subfloor that acts as a moisture barrier, absorbs sound and keeps the floating floor in place.

Some newer underlayments feature antimicrobial properties to keep mold from growing, should it ever get wet under there. Some laminates come pre-attached to an underlayment padding.

All of this is made simpler yet when the professional installation teams from Satolli Carpet & Floor Covering are involved.  They will install your floor quickly, correctly and clean up the mess on the way out. 

AC Ratings

The European Producers of Laminate Flooring (EPLF) developed the Abrasion Ration System. They rate every laminate based on a series of tests, including Tabor Abrasion Test, impact resistance, stain resistance, burn resistance and swelling resistance. Each product is assigned an AC number. Here’s what they mean:

AC1: Moderate Residential
Suitable for moderate residential use, including bedrooms and closets.

AC2: General Residential
Suitable for normal residential applications like living and dining rooms.

AC3: Heavy Residential & Moderate Commercial
Suitable for all residential applications, plus light commercial use, including hotel rooms and small offices.

AC4: General Commercial
Suitable for all residential plus general commercial applications, including offices, boutiques and cafes.

AC5: Heavy Commercial
Suitable for all residential applications plus heavy commercial applications, such as public buildings, department stores, etc.

Not all laminate flooring manufacturers go by these ratings, but most of the best ones do use the AC ratings. Look on the back of the sample boards for the AC ratings.

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